Google+ Reading Teen: Review of Zan-Gah: A Prehistoric Adventure by Allan Richard Shickman

Sunday, August 29, 2010

Review of Zan-Gah: A Prehistoric Adventure by Allan Richard Shickman

Reading level: Young Adult
Paperback: 160 pages

Publisher: Earthshaker Books (July 15, 2007)

Language: English

ISBN-10: 0979035708

ISBN-13: 978-0979035708

Buy the book: Amazon
Visit the site: Earthshaker Books 
The hero, Zan-Gah seeks his lost twin in a savage prehistoric world, encountering suffering, captivity, conflict, love, and triumph. In three years, Zan-Gah passes from an uncertain boyhood to a tried and proven manhood and a position of leadership among his people. Themes: survival, cultures, gender roles, psychological trauma, nature's wonders and terrors.
“She began to move warily in a circle as the men tightened the trap, and as they got closer the lioness began to stride and prowl in a circle so small that she almost seemed to be chasing her tail. But she was watching, watching while she turned and snarled, for a weakness in the ever-tightening ring of her pursuers. Then, at the moment the attack finally was sounded--when the men, putting down their drums and torches, charged on the run with their spears--the lioness saw what she was looking for. One of her enemies was smaller, weaker than the rest. There was a point in the strengthening line that could be broken! Thought merged with furious action and the beast, with a mighty bound of astonishing swiftness, darted toward Zan. Five hundred pounds of snarling fury sprang directly at him with claws bared and fanged mouth open!”



Allan Richard Shickman
ZAN-GAH author Allan Richard Shickman conceived Zan's adventure after thousands of miles of travel through mountains, deserts and forest land.  The idea for this exciting story was born in a cave deep beneath the earth— in the company of hundreds of bats. 





My Review


The review that I did last week of Trackers inspired me to read another book that is not exactly my particular preference. So, I read Zan-Gah.

Again, I was surprised that I enjoyed it just as much as I enjoy many fantasy books.

This book was well-written, but the plot was a bit cliche. It was basically "Brother runs away/is kidnapped and slightly misunderstood, very gifted fighter hero of the story goes out alone to rescue him."

We have all heard this before, of course, but I cannot deny the fact that is was a good book and I will probably be reading the sequel.

It was a easy read, not very long at all, but is enjoyable, and will keep you occupied for the four/five hours that it takes you to read it.I will say that this book was written for a bit of a younger crowd, maybe 9-12, but is one of those books that can keep even an older reader occupied.This was all-together a good book. Not a great book, but enjoyable just the same.








*To the parents: This was a fairly clean book with only a small amount of violence and no language.

5 comments:

  1. Personally, I like the cliqued plots:P As long as there well written and have a good plot.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I read and reviewed this series awhile back. I liked it too. I thought it was more violent than you did though - I guess since I am a super girlie girl. LOL

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  3. Thanks for the review (and the comments). I would say my Zan-Gah books are for readers age 11 and up. I myself don't recommend them for nine year olds.

    Allan R. Shickman

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  4. The third book of the Zan-Gah series, Dael and the Painted People, is nearly finished. Watch for it this summer at the new web address:

    www.zan-gah.net

    I hope you will pay us a visit.

    Allan R. Shickman

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Austin,
    The third book of the Zan-Gah series, Dael and the Painted People, is nearly finished. Watch for it this summer at the new web address:

    www.zan-gah.net

    I hope you will pay us a visit.

    Allan R. Shickman

    ReplyDelete

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