Google+ Reading Teen: THE GOLDEN YARN By Cornelia Funke // More Of A "Like" Than A "LOVE"

Monday, January 25, 2016

THE GOLDEN YARN By Cornelia Funke // More Of A "Like" Than A "LOVE"

Review by Elisa

THE GOLDEN YARN
By Cornelia Funke
Series: MirrorWorld #3
Hardcover: 464 pages
Publisher: Breathing Books (December 1, 2015)
Language: English
Goodreads | Amazon 

Jacob Reckless continues to travel the portal in his father's abandoned study. His name has continued to be famous on the other side of the mirror, as a finder of enchanted items and buried secrets. His family and friends, from his brother, Will to the shape-shifting vixen, Fox, are on a collision course as the two worlds become connected. Who is driving these two worlds together and why is he always a step ahead?

This new force isn’t limiting its influence to just Jacob’s efforts – it has broadened the horizon within MirrorWorld. Jacob, Will and Fox travel east and into the Russian folklore, to the land of the Baba Yaga, pursued by a new type of being that knows our world all to well.


In a Nutshell: 

I think Cornelia Funke would be one of those authors I’d like to visit. Not just because she lives in Germany (okay, well, maybe just because she lives in Germany), but because she has mastered the ability to write a lot, write very well, and recently she even open a publishing house, Breathing Books. I’d love to ask her questions over apfelwein and strudel (and while I’m on that side of the Atlantic, I might as well visit J.K. Rawlings in Edinburg, too)!

Wait, what?! Wikipedia, you’re telling me that Cornelia Funke doesn’t live in Germany anymore? Once I get over that shock, it will probably be okay. I guess I don’t mind meeting her in Beverly Hills instead.

My cousin told me that The Golden Yarn sounds like an unfortunate story because it has an unfortunate name; I imagine she was thinking of a spinner waxing on about life in a tower. Because I know my cousin wasn’t thinking of an invisible life-thread connecting those who’ve gradually woven themselves into the best and most heart-wrenching brand of love. That brand of love which cannot even withstand the most powerful and wicked of witches nor the most charming of treasure hunters.

I imagine my cousin wasn’t considering that there would be Alderelves, banished thousands of years past from the mirror-world by fairies, with their death-inducing beauty. My cousin also didn’t know that the Alderelves had been scheming in our world, collecting faces, giving life to creatures made of silver and glass to infiltrate, steal, maim and speak in the sleep of the one chosen, even if unknowingly, for the Alderevles’ dark task.

The Characters:
I don’t know if you have read Reckless or Fearless, about the adventurous boy in the most mysterious of worlds, where all our fairytales and dreams of the magic of old reside.  This, the third in the saga, continues Jacob Reckless’ search, which finally has a purpose: protecting and maybe even letting go of those he loves for their own sake. The connections with his brother, Will and with Fox, the loyal, shape-shifting vixen only intensify in this book while the war between the stone-faced Goyl and the rest of the mirror world continues.

Most of the characters are the same, and they are each very well-written, building on the last books. I confess, I like them a lot (even the annoying, wants-to-pound-your-face-in bounty hunter, Nerron). With the addition of a human, the silver-freaks, and another heart-palpitating adventurer, most of the cast had already been set. (It was undoubtedly a good cast.)

The World:
Like in her other stories, Cornelia is a master of world-building. It is what draws me to her books! There was tons of creepy, Brother’s Grimm type stuff and all the fascinating forests, freakish creatures, secret possibilities and the perfect blend of disturbing and wonderful.

Unfortunately, it is also what makes me not like them as much, too. They are chocked-full of names and places I cannot pronounce. Also, they are so heavy with details of other stories, histories, and fantasies alluded-to, that I find myself not able to keep up quickly.

In this case, it became a slow process to read, and so I’d put it down, then pick it up again because I wanted to know what would happen, but was tired of thinking after a chapter or two, and would put it down again. It was a slow read.

The Plot:
I think I have probably already told you enough of the plot to hook you (or at least I hope I have!). Pretty much, the storyline was really good. It was what kept me coming back because I wanted to know what would happen next.


The Romance:
There was some good tension in the main relationship of the story (actually, all the relationships). I assumed I knew how it would end, but honestly, I didn’t know, which I really loved. I also appreciated that the romance wasn’t just a spur of the moment lust, or teens that just fell-in-love and knew they were meant to be forever within five minutes of meeting. The romance had been building and it was deep, real, and long-lasting. It made me worry because Funke added in a very good reason to worry! (I wouldn’t have minded a little more swoon, though.)

Other Things I Liked:
  • The Heist! They were in what seems to be an equivalent of Moscow, and they pulled off an awesome heist, reminding me a lot of Six of Crows. Kudos, Cornelia!
  • The Father. Yep, John Reckless’ dad peaks up his nasty head again and I don’t know if I want to hit him for his cowardice or congratulate him on still being worthless. Regardless, it was more depth to the story that I appreciated.
  • The Dark Fairy. Talk about heart-break, this wild woman of magic and moths was fascinating to me as we pursued her around the world to . . . what end? (Maybe you’ll just have to read it to find out.)
  • Traveling the world--I loved that this whole story kept having me pull out maps to try to figure out where we were. I love adventure, travel, and am kinda a geography buff. I’d love to see some maps of Mirror World.

Conclusion:
If all those things appeal to you, I think you should read #1 and #2 first, then read The Golden Yarn. If you’ve already read the first two, I’d say might as well read this one as well, because you’ve already proved you are okay with Cornelia’s style and you will enjoy it, as the story is still new and fresh.

Overall, I liked it, I don’t regret reading it and will probably read the next one. But I just liked it, not loved it and that was mostly because it wasn’t easy entertainment. Considering, should I rate it as a three or a four? It was more on the high-quality literature side of things, which I respect, perfect for a book club, but not great for a fast 2 a.m. read. (Think the Book Thief vs. Twilight.)

P.S. If you know of any authors who want me to visit them in Germany, please introduce us ASAP.

P.S.S. Cornelia, although I just gave The Golden Yarn only a “like” vs. a “love,” and that I wish you still lived in Germany, if despite that you are are still willing to introduce me to German fare and chat with me, I’m open to driving up for a visit.


Sexuality - Heavy (no details, but the sex does happen)
Language - Mild?
Violence - Heavy



Ethereally and unequivocally penned by Elisa (@AverageAdvocate) at www.AverageAdvocate.com “Inspiring the average American to change the world.”

She also dabbles in fiction hidden amongst others occasionally at www.LesNomsDePlume.com. She also really needs a new picture, because she hasn’t had red hair in like, forever. You can follow her on goodreads here.

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